As a woman in the workforce, I find the persistence of wage inequality in this country deeply troubling. It is simply unacceptable that the average American woman makes 77 cents to her male coworker’s dollar — and that’s just the average. There are states where women take home as low as 66 percent of what men do for the exact same workload, and even states who notoriously pay employees more than anywhere else in the country still pay females an average of at least 6 percent less than they pay their male employees.

Additionally, and perhaps even more concerning, is the sad fact that this gap doesn’t get any better in fields traditionally dominated by women. According to a recent study by the Journal of the American Medical Association, even healthcare is guilty of paying it’s male professionals more than it’s female ones who hold the same, or very similar, positions. As a healthcare professional, and a woman, I could not be more disappointed by these results.

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ICD-10 Delay No More — It’s the Final Countdown

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ICD-10 Training and eLearning EducationIt looks like we’ve seen the last of the ICD-10 delays — finally! The possibility of yet another ICD-10 implementation delay was put to rest earlier this week when the Senate approved legislation to repeal the Medicare Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula. Since there was no language regarding ICD-10 implementation delays in the latest version of the SGR bill, it can be expected that the ICD-10 implementation deadline will take place as scheduled on October 1, 2015.

Just check out these headlines regarding the vote from this past Tuesday, April 15:

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3 Trends Impacting Health Care Talent Acquisition

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Editorial Note: This is a contributed guest post written by Amy Goble, Vice President of AHACareerCenter.org, the online job board of the American Hospital Association (AHA).

It’s hard to keep up with all the changes happening in health care, especially as they relate to talent acquisition and the evolving roles of the health care workforce. To help health care recruiters and HR professionals stay abreast of the latest trends, AHACareerCenter.org has released a comprehensive report using resources from the American Hospital Association and other trusted sources. Here are three insights from the 2015 Health Care Talent Acquisition Environmental Scan:

1.  The age range of health care workers spans more than forty years, creating distinctive challenges and opportunities for both employers and employees, such as:

Organizational hierarchies may be restructured as Gen Xers and Millennials rise to leadership roles. As Gen Xers and Millennials become leaders, health care organizations may need to consider flattening their structure and removing departmental and management hierarchies. Gen Xers and Millennials — future leaders and the bulk of the workforce — consider organizational hierarchies as barriers to creativity and innovation.

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coachingIn healthcare, employees who feel engaged with their work are more likely to provide quality care. Many healthcare organizations are finding that positive coaching is an effective way to increase employee engagement and increase quality care.

Rather than relying on one annual performance review, more and more organizations are moving to a model where managers provide constructive feedback to employees throughout the year. Trinity Health System in Steubenville, Ohio, for example, has embraced this type of positive coaching as a way to motivate employees and influence changes in behavior. “When healthcare organizations focus exclusively on disciplining poor performers, they forget about the rest of the employees who are doing a good job. That pulls people down,” said Kathie Pasquarella, Director of Education and Training. “Instead, we try to focus on things that are going well. We show people where they are at and how they can reach the levels of performance we are looking for.”

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Employee turnover is a costly reality in healthcare. Experts estimate that for each percentage increase in annual nurse turnover, an average hospital faces losses of $300,000 per year. With healthcare occupations expected to grow dramatically to meet future demands, turnover isn’t likely to go away on its own anytime soon. In response, healthcare organizations must re-examine the current talent management processes in place to ensure they’re recruiting the best people who are likely to stay long-term.

When it comes to evaluating candidates, its common for many organizations to only take their professional experience and past job performance into consideration. However, this method overlooks the importance of behavioral competencies, such as compassion and customer service orientation that are predictive of retention and contribute to success on-the-job.

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MWHC_Hero Blog (3)Editorial Note: This is a contributed guest post written by HealthcareSource customer Darla Burton,  Director of Physician and Associate Recruitment at Mary Washington Healthcare (MWHC) in Fredericksburg, Virginia. 

Everybody grows up with visions of superheroes in their heads. I am sure as children we have all dressed up as one or two in “our time.” We have had some changes in skill mix  and recruitment challenges, specifically when reviewing our inpatient registered nurse needs.  We have positions posted externally on many different sites; however, we have not tapped into our greatest resource — our associates!

When our marketing partner, Fusion Marketing pitched “Every Hero needs a Partner” as our 2015 recruitment campaign for internal associates to refer an experienced RN or one of our other high demand, low applicant areas…our leadership team fell in love with the concept.

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Bruno 2We’re getting excited for Talent Symposium 2015 – HealthcareSource User Conference, coming to Orlando, FL this October 25-28. We’re so excited that we can’t stop singing, dancing, and making movies. If you haven’t registered yet, be sure to watch our video to see all of the reasons you can’t miss this year’s conference.

Need a little more convincing? Check out my parody of  “Uptown Funk.” If this doesn’t get you dancing straight to Orlando, I don’t know what will. Enjoy!

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hc_hr_week_logo_8x6_copyEditorial Note: In recognition of Health Care HR Week, we have invited , Executive Director for The American Society for Healthcare Human Resources Administration (ASHHRA) to write a guest blog offering her perspective on how healthcare HR professionals can make the most of this week’s celebrations. 

It’s no secret that efforts to recognize and appreciate employees lead to greater engagement, satisfaction, communication, innovation, and results.  Recognizing the key role that health care human resources professional play in the recognition and development of employees throughout our organizations, The American Society for Healthcare Human Resources Administration (ASHHRA) of the American Hospital Association (AHA) encourages everyone to get involved in Health Care HR Week, designed to encourage the acknowledgement of and appreciation for this group of passionate and talented individuals who work in hospitals and health care organizations across the continuum of care.  They deserve recognition for the daily actions they take in areas such as workforce strategy and development, compensation and benefits, employee/labor relations, talent acquisition and management, wellness, etc.

While the possibilities are endless and many organizations create their own ways of celebrating Health Care HR Week, here are a few great ideas you can try:

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7 Fictional Healthcare Pros You Wish You Could Hire

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mindy-lahiriIf you’re anything like me, then when you’re not working you’re probably watching Netflix or Hulu. Who doesn’t love TV? Plus, it’s a simple fact that working in healthcare can be a bit stressful, but I’ve found one of the best ways to unwind after a long day in the medical field is by kicking back and watching fictional healthcare professionals work their own long days in the medical field. Something about seeing them face and conquer the same work-related obstacles that I have to face and conquer every day just helps me keep my chin up, and although medical themed shows may not always be 100% realistic and/or authentic, they do have a penchant for showcasing some phenomenal fictional healthcare professionals. So much so, in fact, that I can’t help but dream of what it would be like to work alongside them on a daily basis.

The list of fantastically inspiring, fictional healthcare professionals that I wish I could work with is massive, but for the sake of brevity here are the top seven fictional healthcare professionals I think we all wish we could hire.

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BronsonLogo_open-drkgrnHealthcare recruiting can be challenging across the board, but it’s especially difficult when seeking applicants for atypical or entry-level positions in departments with high turnover. Beyond the necessity for large pools of candidates, there’s often not enough time to conduct thorough phone screenings, especially with precious time wasted on “non-viable” applicants. When new hires are unaware of job expectations, it often leads to turnover. Alternative recruitment strategies are a solution that has worked well for Bronson Healthcare Group. This regional, not-for-profit health system in southwest Michigan created three innovative programs to hire Environmental Services staff and temporary trainers as well as certain types of nurses and patient care assistants.

Launching Alternative Recruitment with the Test Drive Program

Bronson Healthcare Group began exploring alternative recruitment strategies after learning about a program in use at Michigan Works! This workforce development organization was collaborating with area industries to provide candidates with a realistic picture of what work was like in different sectors. Bronson Healthcare Group explored methods of implementing a similar program in-house. Since it had a large number of positions and high turnover within Environmental Services (EVS), this department seemed like a good place to start; it was necessary that EVS begin attracting more candidates and reducing the high turnover.

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