A PSA for Healthcare Recruiters: Friends Don't Let Friends Hire A KanyeCall it what you will: whether they’re judging a book by its cover, acting on a “gut” feeling, or seeing the world through rose-colored glasses, every healthcare recruiter has hired someone without completing their due diligence, at one point or another.

Picture yourself in this hypothetical situation: a nursing candidate comes into your office and sits down for an interview. His name is Ken Yevest and, like Barbie’s boyfriend, he seems picture perfect. He is well dressed, cordial, funny, and bright — an honors program graduate from one of top nursing programs in the country — and, best of all, he has the exact credentials and qualifications for this particular nursing role. Assuming he’ll be just as charming outside the interview room as he is in it — after all, how could he not be? — you get approval and extend Ken an offer, right then and there.

When he accepts the job, you feel like you’ve been elected victor in the ever-competitive war for healthcare talent. A guy like Ken is destined to be one of the greats; in fact, you think he could quite possibly be the best hire of your career. RNs like him are the force your hospital needs to improve patient satisfaction and HCAHPS scores; they hold the key to achieving ANCC Magnet Recognition. You’re sure that Ken is going to make a difference and, when he does, you will be known as the recruiter who brought him onboard. Knowing this, you are calm and cool on the outside — obviously, you’re a professional — but, on the inside, you are so excited that you have to keep yourself from yelling out a celebratory “YESSS!” That, of course, would be embarrassing.

Read More

5 ‘House of Cards’ Quotes that Apply to HR

Published by |

House of Cards_ gif Editorial Note: This blog contains spoilers of seasons one and two of ‘House of Cards’. If you don’t want to know where the show left off at the end of season two, don’t read this. Instead,  go home right now and watch it on Netflix — and then come back and read this blog.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve been waiting patiently (or maybe not so patiently) for season 3 of the Netflix original series House of Cards. If you’ve seen the show, you know that main character Frank Underwood, played by Academy Award winning actor Kevin Spacey, is a force to be reckoned with. Starting off as a lowly congressman with a grudge, he quickly ascended to the highest role in the land: President of the United States. To say that Frank is ruthless is a massive understatement. He’s the type of person who decides what he wants and is willing to do absolutely anything to achieve it — even if that means throwing an unsuspecting person in front of a train. He’s the most cunning, conniving, and confident president in the history of the United States. He also happens to be completely fictional, though he’s such a strong and powerful character, that’s sometimes easy to forget.

As Netflix’s revolutionary House of Cards returns for a third season on February 28, it’s natural to want to “binge-watch” the first two seasons to make sure that you’re up to speed. As you do, you’ll begin to notice that when Frank Underwood speaks eloquently about strategy and power, he isn’t necessarily just talking about his own quest to one day become the Commander in Chief by any means necessary. He often seems to be commenting on the world of HR in particular.

Read More

5 Ways To Ensure Your Organization Offers Equitable Wages

Published by |

OscarsPatricia Arquette sparked a much-needed dialog about wage inequality with her comments at the this past Sunday’s Academy Awards. When she went up to accept her Best Supporting Actress Oscar, she said, “It’s our time to have wage equality once and for all, and equal rights for women in the United States of America.”

According to studies out of the White House, it’s been reported that on average, women working full-time earn 77 cents for every dollar that men earn.  To dive a little deeper into income inequality and wage gap issues, a Glassdoor survey found that two out of five employees (39%) do not believe they receive fair pay in their current job, with more women (42%) than men (34%) who do not believe that they are being compensated fairly.

Unfortunately, the disparity in pay is also especially apparent in healthcare. While nearly three-quarters of health and medical services managers being women, men in this field typically make 35% more than their female colleagues. As an HR professional in healthcare, you are in a position to address disparities and offer the sort of fair pay and compensation packages that attracts and retains top healthcare talent. Here are five things you can do:

Read More

11 Things Healthcare Professionals Wish Everyone Knew

Published by |

Guest blogger and healthcare professional Elizabeth Enochs shares what she wishes everyone would understand about what it’s like to work in the healthcare industry. We hope you find this article relatable and encourage you to share your thoughts in the comments below. 

As an English major and an avid writer I never expected to — or remotely wanted to — work in healthcare. But in May of 2014 after being laid off from a part-time waitressing gig on my 24th birthday (depressing, right?), I decided to get over my aversion to the industry and apply for an open administrative assistant job at a dialysis facility in my town.

I knew it would be a good, resume-building job with a steady paycheck and great hours. Plus, I was tired of having anxiety attacks every time I had to pay my bills and buy groceries in the same week. So I applied, interviewed, peed in a cup, and got the job. I felt extremely lucky when I got the call confirming my employment, but I also felt so nervous and intimidated about becoming a part of this world that was so foreign to me that I couldn’t sleep or eat right for weeks. I’d mainly worked in retail before this, and now I was working with people who’d been diagnosed with end-stage renal disease. In retail, the biggest problem I’d faced was an angry customer yelling at me for not returning their clothes without a receipt. Now I was trying to help people whose kidneys didn’t work.

Read More

Desk-Calendar-October-1-2015Will the current implementation date of October 1, 2015 hold or won’t it? That seems to be the big question on everyone’s mind when it comes to ICD-10 this year. The original implementation deadline has already been delayed twice– from October 1, 2013 to 2014, and then eventually to this year. As it is, the United States is the only industrialized country not using the “new classification system” (is it really still “new” if it was developed in 1992??) and it’s still not certain whether or not the 2015 deadline will stick.

Last week, seven witnesses testified before a subcommittee of The House Energy and Commerce Committee about the benefits and downsides to ICD-10 implementation. HCPro’s ICD-10 Trainer Blog does a good job of summing up the meeting, and I suggest everyone take a moment to read their full post, but in a nutshell:

Read More

With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, the time is right. Be honest, are you head-over-heels, 100%, no-doubt-about-it,  absolutely in LOVE with your applicant tracking system (ATS)?  As a recruiter, you may already be using an ATS. But is it the right ATS for YOU?  Is it the right solution for your healthcare organization?

If you face any of these challenges, it may be time for a new applicant tracking system:

Read More

Recruiters — What Makes Your Organization Special?

Published by |

This is a contributed guest post written by HealthcareSource customer Tammy Anderson,  Director of Talent Acquisition at Avera Health in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. 

Have you ever thought about what it would be like to have your hospital be on David Letterman’s Top 10 list?  Well, we at Avera Health haven’t quite made David Letterman’s Top 10 list, but we do have a list of our own that we think showcases why people would want to work with us!

How did we get to the list?  A few months ago we began a Lean Transformation Journey with David Szary from Lean Human Capital which included a review of our career website.  As we took a deep dive to evaluate what we had on our site we realized that it looked pretty generic, at times too wordy, and maybe wasn’t as eye catching as it could be.  Was the top talent that we wanted to capture even reading our postings, or were they moving on to the next website? What could make them stay and apply?  Our healthcare system reaches across an expansive, rural geographic area that can be a recruitment struggle, so how do we sell Avera to passive and active candidates?

With Lean Human Capital’s help, we created new, visually appealing job postings on our applicant tracking system, HealthcareSource Position Manager, that instantly presented a compelling value proposition. As we were doing so, we recognized that in each of our postings we wanted to say what makes working for Avera so special and why you should choose Avera.  Our goal was to showcase the following things that set us apart from our competitors:

Read More

Editor’s Note: This is a highly official, authentic image of HealthcareSource’s Director of Marketing Rachel Gisele Bundchen-Weeks that has not be graphically altered in any way, shape, or form.

Recruiting and retaining exceptional individuals to contribute to organizational excellence is a simple concept that most organizations find difficult to fulfill. One organization that has mastered the philosophy of talent management is the New England Patriots. Whether you’re a football fan or not, and I recognize that not all football fans are Patriots fans, the Patriots do provide excellent examples of how to recruit and retain top talent.

The actions of an individual are not necessarily indicative of an entire team’s successes and failures, but rather it is the actions of many individuals working together towards a common goal of organizational excellence. But for a team to do well, it first relies on the individual players to each do their part — hence this season’s adopted motto of the Patriots “Do your job!”. Believe it or not, healthcare talent management professionals can actually learn a thing or two from Belichick, Brady, and the rest of the gang (yes, even Gronk) about how each and every aspect of recruiting and retaining top talent can  drive overall organizational success.

The way the Patriots have built their team over the years holds lessons that can be applied  to healthcare talent management. Here are 5 key takeaways and lessons learned from some legendary (and not-so-legendary) members of the Patriots organization:

Read More

How to Use Behavioral Assessments to Improve Patient Care

Published by |

To remain competitive, healthcare organizations need to hire employees who provide a high level of patient- and resident-focused care and who are committed team members. Science-based behavioral assessments can help healthcare organizations choose the right people for the jobs they need to fill and do a better job of managing and developing the people they already have on staff.

Getting the right people in the right positions is an important part of patient care. “A lot of patient care has to do with patient satisfaction,” says Mike DiPietro, CMO at HealthcareSource, which provides behavioral assessment solutions. “Happy employees make happy patients.”

Read More

Top 5 Physician Concerns for 2015: How You Can Help

Published by |

Physicians are frustrated and fed up with the latest healthcare reform changes. The main issue? They feel the new mandates, which include an increase in paperwork and patient load, will decrease the quality and time they have to spend with their patients. A survey of 20,000 doctors led by Merritt Hawkins highlights the five main issues of contention of physicians.

Read More