How Recruiting is Like Playing Candy Crush

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Candy Crush
This is a guest blog by Meghan Doherty, our Content Marketing Specialist at HealthcareSource. Meghan is responsible for our educational content development pertaining to the HealthcareSource Quality Talent SuiteSM and manages our white papers, surveys, thought leadership webinars, social media channels, and the HealthcareSource Blog. Connect with Meghan on LinkedIn

Recently, it seems like everywhere I go, I hear someone talking about Candy Crush. Whether it is in the break room at work or someone ranting about it on Facebook or covering its popularity on the evening news, it seems to be on everyone’s mind. For those of you who are unfamiliar with the popular game, you should probably stop reading this blog post now. I’m not kidding. Once you hear about it, you’ll download it on your smart phone or tablet, and you will then be consumed in a full on Candy Crush addiction.  

For the brave readers out there who have yet to hear about the number one downloaded smart phone game, I’ll continue. Candy Crush Saga is a game that is a terribly addicting puzzle — a unique twist on a traditional pattern-matching games, such as Tetris or Bejewled Blitz. The infinite-level game features brightly colored candies aligned on a grid. Once you slide three matching pieces together, they burst and as those disappear you can find more matches to complete the level and move on to the next. As with most things in my life, my recent addiction to Candy Crush got me to thinking about how his relates to recruiting and HR. For anyone in the field of recruiting, here are three ways that recruiting is like Candy Crush:

Addicted to Recruiting

Waiting in line at the grocery store? Play Candy Crush while you wait for a price check. Nothing’s interesting on Instagram? Play Candy Crush instead. Sitting in the waiting room at the dentist? Play Candy Crush for the next 45 minutes while you wait. Just like there always seems to be an opportunity for recruiting, there always seems to be an opportunity to play a round of Candy Crush. Anyone who’s been a recruiter for a while can testify to the fact that they are constantly in search of candidates. Have you ever been scrolling through Facebook and learned that your college roommate’s cousin’s friend is a nurse and wondered if she was interested in working at your hospital? Admit it, you definitely have. Whether you are scrolling through LinkedIn, out to dinner with friends, or at a family party — everyone is a potential candidate. Recruiting is more than just a 9-5 job. Everywhere you go you could come into contact with someone that could potentially work at your organization. This “addiction” to recruiting is much like an addiction to Candy Crush. Just like you can’t seem to stop recruiting healthcare candidates, you just can’t seem to stop playing Candy Crush once you start! 

Better Match = Better Outcome

In Candy Crush, the goal is to burst these brightly colored candies, by aligning rows of three, four and five candies to move on to the next level. Just like in the world of recruitment, when you’re playing Candy Crush the better the match, the better the outcome. When a candidate is hired based on their inherent behavioral competencies and their past professional experiences, they are more likely to be a good match for the organization. When employees are naturally aligned to the mission, vision, and values of an healthcare organization they are more likely to fit in with their colleagues and the company culture. When recruiters assess and hire candidates for fit, they are more likely to produce successful hires that will stay long term and provide quality care for patients. 

Referrals Fuel your Pipeline

The creators of Candy Crush were very strategic in their design of the game. You are only allotted five lives before you get locked out of the game and must wait the designated amount of time before playing again. However, should you find yourself unable to wait the designated amount you time, you can either: A) Pay $0.99 for more lives or B) Go to your Facebook friends for help. I would say that most people are unwilling to pay the $0.99 for more lives on a video game, but that would contradict the fact that Candy Crush is reported to be bringing in $633,000 per day. But if you’re anything like me and not willing to pay for lives, you’ll have to turn to your Facebook friends for more lives. Just like in Candy Crush, to feed your addiction to recruiting, sometimes you have to ask for help. Employee referrals are a great way to bring in top talent to an organization. “The best way to build a quality team is to hire quality people. And often the best people are referred by our own employees. We regularly ask our employees to refer the really great people they’ve worked with in the past and want to collaborate with again,” said Martha Livingston, Talent Acquisition and Retention Manager at HealthcareSource. According to Livingston, employee referrals fuel the HealthcareSource talent pipeline, “Referrals fuel our pipeline, giving us the reserves we need when openings come up. Because we have built great relationships with our referrals already, we can easily make those connections to bring on more great hires!”

For recruiters, there are quite a few parallels to the job and Candy Crush. By focusing on alternative sourcing strategies, hiring candidates for fit and receiving employee referrals, you will soon be a recruiting all-star, just as you’ve mastered Candy Crush. 

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Meghan Doherty

About Meghan Doherty

Meghan Doherty is the Content Marketing Manager at HealthcareSource. In her role, Meghan manages the creation and distribution of educational resources to help healthcare talent management professionals recruit and retain the best workforce possible. When she's not creating content for HealthcareSource, Meghan enjoys long walks through the shoe department, binge-watching anything and everything on Netflix, peanut butter sandwiches, and watching Jeopardy every night at 7:30.