Even with resumes, references, and cover letters to inform you about a candidate, the hiring process can still feel like a blind endeavor. You may even wish for a crystal ball to reveal just how well the person you hire will align with your organizational culture and employees over time. If you really want to predict the future, using healthcare behavioral assessments can be one of the most accurate ways to do so when it comes to hiring in healthcare.

Learn how Daniel Blandford, Employment Supervisor at Owensboro Health and 2016 Talent-in-Talent Award Winner, leveraged several HealthcareSource talent management solutions to implement new predictive hiring models and candidate selection programs across the organization to combat turnover and improve employee retention rates

Mental and behavioral health conditions are strongly related to many risk behaviors for chronic diseases and substance abuse, as well as to the occurrence, treatment, and course of chronic diseases like asthma, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 300 million people live with depression and stated that the “lack of support for people with mental disorders, coupled with a fear of stigma, that prevent many from accessing the treatment they need to live healthy, productive lives.” And to make matters worse, the supply of trained psychiatrists can’t keep up with demand.

The healthcare hiring process has become more challenging and competitive than ever for recruiters. But you can reduce your time-to-fill by improving how you interview candidates. We’re not suggesting you should rush the interview process — the wrong hire can cost the organization more in the end. In fact, a study published in Healthcare Finance News found that one unfilled healthcare position can cost an average of $7,700. Here are five interviewing best practices you should consider to meet today’s healthcare hiring demands.

Behavioral interview questions increase the reliability of the interview process in assessing your healthcare organization’s leadership candidates and more accurately predict their potential for success than traditional interviews.

In healthcare, extended interviewing and thorough hiring processes are both necessary and inevitable. Unfortunately, their importance doesn’t prevent them from taking a toll on those involved — perhaps even causing a few “healthcare hiring headaches” that could contribute to HR burnout. Of course, this really shouldn’t come as a surprise to those of you who work in healthcare.

Employee turnover is a costly reality in any industry and retaining top talent in healthcare is particularly challenging and oftentimes problematic. Employee turnover not only has a significant impact on patient satisfaction and treatment outcomes; it also comes at a high price. It is estimated that every percentage point increase in nurse turnover costs an average

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Hiring in healthcare is complex — you’re dealing with a high volume of job applicants for multi-disciplinary positions, competing in the “war for talent” for qualified candidates, adjusting to shrinking budgets, responding to hiring manager requests, and much, MUCH more. Essentially, talent acquisition professionals are expected “to do more with less,” and in the hectic healthcare

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Sometimes, life as a talent acquisition professional can feel a little like you’re living in a pop song. It doesn’t happen too often, but every once in a while, you end up living out a lyrical tale of “pretty lies,” and “shattered hopes” between you and a prospective candidate who you honestly thought would “show

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The interview process is not black and white for any industry, but interviewing in healthcare is especially complex. Multiple facilities, a wide range of positions to fill, three shifts, strict HR compliance regulations, high turnover, and common interview mistakes are just some of the factors that contribute to the challenging world of hiring in healthcare.