Healthcare recruiters and talent management professionals know that nurses play a vital role across many hospital departments. As the number of patients increases, so does the demand for these essential professionals. To properly understand the challenges you’re facing in attracting, hiring, training, and retaining nurse staff, you need a good understanding of the current and future landscape.

Competition for top-flight nurses in today’s market is tight. As a healthcare recruiter, you need to realize high-quality candidates consider more than wages or salary when choosing which organization to join. Learn about five of the most important culture and engagement factors nurses weigh when deciding between potential employers, and integrate them into your nurse recruitment strategies.

Until recently, most online recruiting strategies could be described as “post and pray,” place duration-based job ads on various job boards and hope that you get enough applications to make a hire before time runs out. This is a gambling game where recruiters hope to get enough applications to fill their pipeline to make a hire. But do you have to gamble? Pay-per-application came along in 2014 to help recruiters ensure they were paying for results. Pay-per-application sites, like Job2Careers, let you post jobs for free, and pay only when an applicant submits a resume.

Old-school recruiting tactics might not be enough to fill your positions, especially on a timeline that works for your organization. That’s why healthcare recruiters are evolving their responsibilities to include components of marketing. This is known as recruitment marketing. When you think like a marketer, your tactics are brand-led and candidate-focused. Instead of focusing on promoting job openings, recruiters need to promote the entire brand, including the organization’s reputation in the community and beyond, and its values and culture. Here’s are three ways to begin thinking and acting like a marketer.

Recruiters’ jobs are evolving, especially in competitive fields like healthcare. As you incorporate more elements of marketing into your quest to attract and hire quality talent, you want to be sure you have the right tools. That’s why it’s important to understand the differences between recruitment marketing software and an applicant tracking system.

If you work for a healthcare organization, you’re no stranger to emergencies, including those in the human resources department. You have firsthand experience trying to fill open positions for nurses, physicians, and more, while your pool of qualified talent seems to be shrinking. Luckily, the HealthcareSource® ER can help you with recruitment marketing.

I have some great news to share: HealthcareSource has completed its acquisition of Centricity™ Contingent Staffing from GE Healthcare. This is the third time this vital suite of contingent staffing solutions has been acquired, underlining the tremendous value and importance they offer to the healthcare staffing industry. 

What Is Recruitment Marketing?

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The healthcare recruiting game is changing. It’s no longer about just meeting your most immediate needs — it’s about building a pipeline of qualified candidates so you can find the right talent at the right time to fill your open positions. This takes planning and a new approach that incorporates recruitment marketing.

In the spirit of Healthcare HR Week, here are five actionable tips from The Recruiter Academy Certified Recruiter (RACR) Program for healthcare recruiters to become more effective and advance their healthcare recruitment careers.

4 Ways to Leverage Patient Stories to Recruit Top Talent

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Imagine you’re a recruitment team of one at a rural community hospital with 350 employees. On your own, you’re managing 64 hard-to-fill open reqs. You’ve tripled your ad spend for job postings. You’ve attended every local job fair. You’ve implemented new technology platforms. You’ve promoted your employee referral program like crazy. Yet despite all of your efforts, you’re still not getting the results you need. Instead of starting a new initiative from the ground up, could there be a hidden opportunity using existing resources? There may be. If your marketing team produces patient stories, you can leverage their efforts as a recruitment tool.