Even though there are more than 4 million active nurses in the U.S., healthcare organizations are challenged to fill nurse leadership roles. Nurses need a way to gain the higher levels of education and training required to assume these more demanding leadership positions. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has risen to that challenge. Find out what your organization could do, too.

How to Help Your Nurses Transition from RN to BSN

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In 1902, Susan B. Anthony suggested that a “day will come when nurses will be university prepared.” As evidenced by this quote, the debate over the educational preparation of RNs has raged on for over a century. Despite Anthony’s prediction, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services — only about 50 percent of the nation’s 2.8

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I believe the only way to address a challenge at work or in life, is to learn everything about the problem, as well as the potential solutions at hand. It takes effort, determination, and commitment to move from a place of stagnation into a position of a continuous learner actively engaged in creating solutions. But while this work shouldn’t be underestimated, often I find that, when it comes down to it, we are only hindered by our own ability to change personal and team habits.

Building a Patient-Centered Workforce™, made of highly-engaged people and teams who endeavor to provide patient-centered care, is crucial to your organization’s success. When patient satisfaction is tied to revenue, your employees’ clinical and behavioral competencies can significantly impact your bottom line.

A structured, proactive approach to leadership development in healthcare is an essential hallmark of many organizations across the care continuum. However, many healthcare organizations don’t have a defined process for identifying potential leaders and preparing them to succeed in their new role.

When you look at the top people in a given industry, you’ll find that many of them once worked for the same leader. Research into the practices of these “superbosses” uncovered similarities in their talent management strategies. Here are four habits of superbosses that healthcare leaders can adopt to improve their own ability to recruit and retain the best of the best.

As the demand for healthcare services continues to increase, so does the demand for healthcare professionals. There’s a lot of competition tapping into the same talent pool, and it’s becoming a lot more difficult to hire qualified talent.

Strong healthcare leadership is critical to providing great quality care to your patients. Leaders set the bar for excellent quality care for the rest of your employees, and coach their teams to raise their standard of care. A great leader will attract, hire, and retain additional high-quality talent who see the leader as someone they’d

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The only constant in healthcare is change. To facilitate organizational change — leaders need to take a step back and realize where change really begins: your people. As the CEO of a healthcare talent management solution provider, I regularly discuss organizational development and talent management strategies with healthcare leaders.  From these conversations, I’ve gathered the

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Executives in healthcare and other industries are always interested in how to find and develop the next wave of organizational leaders; and both hiring and coaching processes are focused on pinpointing individuals with the right skills. If you think that leaders are born rather than developed, you might rely more heavily on recruitment to find these stars

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